Google Analytics

Posted by Spike Spike

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Google Analytics is a tool that allows companies to track visits and usage of their websites, from different forms of media (email, social media etc.). We add parameters to our URLs so our clients’ Google Analytics can see visits driven by our emails. Therefore parameters don’t need to be added for domains the client doesn’t own. If we were building an email and there was a link to some random tech blog, we wouldn’t need to add parameters to that URL.

Google Analytics parameters usually look something like this: http://www.example.com/?utm_source=Spike&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20150706%20Campaign%20Name. We can build our parameters using this tool, or by adapting parameters from previous emails.

  • utm_source = most of the time its Spike or it can be set to email depending on what your client prefer to use.
  • utm_medium = is always email. This is the marketing medium the link is located: cpc; banner; email.
  • utm_campaign = contains date and campaign name.
  • utm_content = not used as commonly, however sometime it’s required by the client emails. Used to differentiate links, eg. Article 1, article 2.

It’s important to note that if the existing link already has a question mark (?) in it somewhere, then the parameters need to begin with an ampersand (&) instead of a question mark. The link will likely break or any clicks won’t be recorded if this isn’t done.

http://www.example.com/?questionmark=true?utm_source=Spike &utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20150706%20Campaign%20Name

http://www.example.com/?questionmark=true&utm_source=Spike &utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20150706%20Campaign%20Name ✔️

Some links may not work when they’ve had GA parameters added to them (particularly if they’re anchor links, for example http://www.website.com#halfwayDownPage). Because of this, it’s important to check your emails’ links still function after they’ve had parameters added to them.

If you’re confused about how to add parameters for the email you’re working – or even if you’ll need them – look at a few previous emails of the same type, or ask someone else that’s worked on the email before.